The No-Meat Survival Food Pt. 1


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In today’s episode we demonstrate several methods for preparing parched corn, including methods from a pamphlet on maize written by Benjamin Franklin.

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Survival Cave Food Canned Pork, 12 - Pk. 14 1/2 - oz. cans
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Jinger Jarrett

Jinger Jarrett is a full time freelance writer, author and internet marketer who teaches small businesses how to get started online and then market their businesses for free. She is also a US Army Veteran and seeks to connect with other veterans who are interested in starting a business or are currently business owners and want to connect.

46 thoughts on “The No-Meat Survival Food Pt. 1

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    first time I've ever said "oh, damn you!" Please forgive me .. I don't know how I'm going to wait to find out what happens next!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    If I may offer a suggestion: when cooking with ashes, be sure to bury what you're cooking. This minimizes the oxygen that gets to the food, and prevents it from burning. I've done this many times with roasted acorns and nuts, and I suspect it would work equally well with corn kernels. On the flip-side, I'm now curious if your sand technique will work with the acorns…
    Alternatively, leave fresh corn inside the husk, and the leaves will retain the moisture, making a roasted (rather than parched) corn on the cob. This technique can be used for almost anything, and a wrapping of fresh leaves (a weave of cattail reeds, to use an American example) is something that has been used worldwide by various folk, to cook everything from meat and fish to succulent fruits without getting (much) ash in your food.

    Also, thanks for mentioning hominy. I had never heard of it, as grits and the like aren't overly common up here in Canada (though I've eaten my share of tortillas). Lye always struck me as something one would want to keep away from foodstuffs, and my reaction is rather like if you had suggested soaking my corn in bleach – but this appears to be a common and desirable thing! Colour me astounded! Once again, your videos are broadening my horizons and encouraging me to research new materials.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    i like the salt experiment. it gives the corn flavour too!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    cool I like parched corn .. great info. I'll try the salt method for popping.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    ahhh these videos have such great production value!!! I love them!!!!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    The process here was so cool and so much what makes this channel special. You did some research and experimentation and then more people added information and experiences. Well done to all. Keep up the good work.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Jon… is that a phone I see in your pocket? how dare you be historically inaccurate! lol just kidding it's funny how I noticed it almost immediately though.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    My mom just burned some popcorn in the microwave, so I had smell-o-vision for this video.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Nice. You can keep the hominy. Never took to the flavor. The rest was neat

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    That was really interesting!!!! I love living closer to small towns, except for when it comes to trying to find these different types of corn! Especially trying to stay away GMOs now days. Would LOVE to try some of these! 🙂

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Rather than just spreading the corn straight on the embers wouldn't a flat stone that was heated in the fire be easier?

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I won't list any puns but, it was great video as well as a wealth of information as always.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Sand?! No wonder they all had wooden teeth back then…

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Amazing as always. I'm entertained and educated every single episode!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Anyone born in the Western Hemisphere is native American. I am American Indian." Stop with the politically correct crap, it is offensive. We are Indians.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    my method, leave on cob, hang till dry, remove from cob. This is ready to eat. Parch in pan, with or without butter or oil. Eat or store. Sand parching is ancient and worldwide.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I have been watching "how to puff rice" videos recently, and apparently the heated-sand method is commonly used for puffing rice in India. Interesting to see it used for parching corn.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    You seem like you really enjoy what you're doing! That's fantastic! Keep up the great work!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    There is street food in Asia where they pop rice via sand much like you are doing with corn.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Wow, very interesting! Maybe I give that a try with regular corn. (Here in my city it is a bit difficult to find all these different kinds of corn.)

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Ok, I have to ask, were you able to get all the sand out, or was it like trying to eat something on the beach on a super windy day (when the wind blows sand all over your food) 🙂 Great video! Where did they get lye in those days? Its not like you could go to the grocery and buy food safe lye. 🙂

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I love this format for the episodes! it's so dynamic and I love that we kind of get to see a more real side of you as you figure these things out on the fly, love your guy's work please keep it up!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Many countries still use the sand popping method, even on industrial levels.!!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Those aren't brown, they are black, burnt…
    They would be very bitter, you have to use oil or lard to minimize the burn…

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I love the idea of popping the corn in the salt! Never heard of that before.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I would probably stave having to do all of this while living in the 21st century. Unless I have a microwave oven and a bag of Jolly Time!! Cheers!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I think if you stuck a decent size flat rock in the fire for a bit you could pour the corn on it to parch.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Stop burning your corn! Black = burnt corn = Bad taste!

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Horace Kephart refers to this as pinole in "Camping and Woodcraft", and says it is parched in the hot ashes. That would be very much like the sand or salt methods, but without the pot. He also says that the Indians preferred using the blue sweetish corn to make it.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I was at a reenactment and the commissary had prepared craklen corn and he said the song Johnny cracked corn was about roster or toasted corn. do you have an idea if this true?

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    When I heard that method, I didn't think, "this isn't gonna work," because I watch Good Eats. :p

    Boy oh boy, though, the salt method is a huge upgrade.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I wonder if the corn toasted directly in the ashes would sink in a bucket of water thus separating it.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I made parched corn for the first time last year. I bought some Peaches and Cream (that is the name of the type of corn – has yellow and white kernels on the same cob and is fairly small kernels) from an Amish market. I dried the corn on the cob in my dehydrator just to speed up the process. I then shelled the corn off the cob and 'toasted' the kernels in an iron skillet on the stove over low heat in just a little bacon grease. I sprinkled a little salt and a little sugar over the finished kernels while still warm. It tasted really good , had a nice crunch and was surprisingly easy to chew.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    To get popcorn out of most corn kinds, just add oil…

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    ~~~I got unsubscribed got lucky and found you again .~~~

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    small amounts of ash or charcoal are perfectly fine to eat, but remember that when people swallow poisons, they are usually given charcoal slurry’s to drink, these bind up the chemicals so that they wont be absorbed, however, charcoal also bonds many things, including necessary vitamins and minerals, which is why you dont want to eat too much of it, too often. the ash on the other hand, is mostly potassium hydroxide, which aside from neutralizing stomach acid, can also aid in the break down of the kernels, ash it is caustic, although, i would think that would only happen if you left it in a bowl of water first, so that the caustic material could actually penetrate the kernels

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Loved this video. I think its important to note that corn based diets are deficient in niacin and many of the settlers and people in the south had pellagra from it. The hominy you have, however, has undergone nixtamalization, which unlocks the niacin and is the reason why native/central americans thrived on corn based diets & many still do today like the Tarahumara Indians who are among the worlds greatest runners.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I love parched corn, however as a diabetic this would kill me if it was a steady diet of it everyday

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    Dang I gotta wait an entire week to watch him eat sandy corn.

  • June 8, 2017 at 10:21 am
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    I loved this, as part of this you must look into Pellagra when they ingested to much corn you may find it would make a good video story a lot of history and nutrition.

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