How to Use Jargon and Military Experience to Create Success in Life [Video]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qLjHqUifp8

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Have you gotten out of the military uniform and just realized how much you don't know the military
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jargon and industry industry jargon that were equipped with and fall into in the private sector are
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not necessarily different it's just a different language to learn stay tuned to learn more on how to view
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money as a tool increase your communication skills and how to simplify industry jargon to
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translate your natural profitable skill sets the military has already equipped you with
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and much much more you know they painted it as big failure when it
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turned out to have been a success because they the the spokesman
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didn't define for them what air assault meant so when when you have jargon and you know it's second nature to you so
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you got to think about this a little bit when you have jargon that's a military jargon military words
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simple as they are aerosol it means you know one thing to you think about it from
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the the receiver's viewpoint what do they know about the military think about how they are going to
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perceive it today's show is going to be brought to you by brute force sandbags
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below brute force sandbags are 100 american-made sandbags gear and much
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more ambitious fat go and check them out right now welcome to the ambitious fit podcast my
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name is chris i am a marine corps combat veteran social entrepreneur here i dive into the
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trenches with today's most ambitious goal-oriented and growth-minded military
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veterans on the planet to empower you with the golden grenades needed to break through
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new levels of satisfaction fulfillment and success after stability is no longer a challenge to overcome
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buckle up ambitious vet it's time to break through new levels of success in your life it's time
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to get into the trenches dig into your purpose and fire up your life fulfillment
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and the ambitious vet podcast starts now what's going on in bishop vet we're right back inside the
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trenches with steven nachke steve has transitioned from the active duty four times the first time in 1989 and
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last time in 2006. he retired from the army reserves in 2012. he started his program
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program management consulting business in 2002 and he provides program and project
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management expertise to organizations that provide goods and services to the department of defense
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he's based out of florida but has traveled from the far east to the middle east to europe to central
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america and throughout the united states steve are you there i'm here brother welcome to the show man i mean
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you re you literally transitioned four times out of the military yes i've i was mobilized uh
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three times at my initial uh stint on active duty and then i was mobilized three separate times
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now one of those times i was only uh demobilized for a month and i knew i was getting re-mobilized
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but technically i've transitioned four times gone through the process interesting so
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you've kind of mastered this thing a little bit huh a little bit yeah uh you know it helped
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helped having been a reservist and having um real life occupation to start with and
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it made it a lot easier a lot smoother uh but the first time the first time was more difficult
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and um that probably should be that might be a little bit of the focus but uh
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you know i i was on active duty i was an infantry officer in the army at fort stewart
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in georgia i got re-branched into the ordinance corps and then i decided to get
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out and i thought hey i have an engineering degree world needs engineers it should be easy
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for me to get a job i was wrong uh the uh you know i wasn't really paying
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attention to the economy at the time i was focused on a military stuff and i waited until i
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actually left start looking for a job and um at the time we were in a recession um
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i thought well surely nasa needs engineers and there's florida's just down the coast i'll just
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go down to uh brevard county go work at the space center
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well they were still recovering from the uh the shuttle disaster a few years earlier
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and they didn't need anybody so um again i was wrong about that so it took a while
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but eventually i found a job as an engineer and uh worked my way up from there but
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uh i was not prepared uh they didn't really have a tap class or anything and uh even then
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it's too late by the time by the time you actually get out or going through out processing
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it's a little bit late then to uh start the process and i found that out personally and i
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think other people found that out on their own so my my thought is
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start two years in so i mean if you're in for a if you're only gonna be in for two years
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you need to start immediately um if you're in you know for 20 or more you know about when you're gonna retire
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start looking two years prior start getting involved with local organizations of where you want to end
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up it's uh used to be a little bit more difficult if you wanted to end up
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somewhere other than your duty station but right now organizations all over are having events having meetings
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via zoom or other remote technologies and you can participate and become part of the local scene
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even if you're remote so if you're at fort bragg or if you're at cherry point or or wherever you're at and you want to
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go to idaho if that's where you want to end up find a chapter of a local organization
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could it could be even the american legion or maybe it's national defense industry association
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women in defense fc uh all sorts of different organizations
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uh project management's institute which is what i'm part of as well there's local chapters that are willing
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to take you in and you get get your name known before you start that transition so you
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can kind of get a interact with folks who are outside the military
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and get an idea of what is going on in the community you want to go into and they'll recognize your name when you
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get there and depending on the medium use they might recognize your face yeah
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no i love that practical tip there steve right just getting into local organizations that
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necessarily may or may not have um a military association right to where you can get into working
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creating opportunity the funny thing is you're probably you'll probably laugh at me but the one that i started
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plugging into six months out was the unemployment office
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a lot of free resources man and uh sure a lot of workshops and it i'll tell you this one of the workshops that i
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attended if i wouldn't have leveraged the one tip that they gave me which was write a
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personal thank you note after the interview um i would have never landed that
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that first job that led me into my first um year out of the uniform right so sure i think that's key to your point
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getting into organizations stuff like that and creating that opportunity gaining that knowledge gaining that
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wisdom on building those relationships wouldn't you agree sure
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i agree and you know i you know when we were still doing things in person way back a couple months ago
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uh there would be people who you know i'm i'm retiring in 90 days and then they'd start coming out and
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coming out to the organization and uh it's like good step probably a little bit late go tell your buddies
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you do this two years ago um you know it and you know it's just getting a face a name
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in an industry that you want to be in and there's all sorts of organizations uh some are defense related and that's
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primarily what i'm aligned with but there's marketing there's
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human resources there's all sorts of organizations um that aren't necessarily related to
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the military whatever you want to get into or think you want to get into and maybe
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joining those organizations will change your mind and point you in a different direction but
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do it early on take some of your time instead of heading out to the bar with your buddies
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attend some of these uh conferences or meetings spend a little extra time
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in the evening uh talking to folks be part of the the chat and ask some questions
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and let folks know that you're looking to to move there in a couple years and
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you're looking for a for a job and people will help you out yeah just be vulnerable like i think the
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biggest landmine i hit and i'm excited to dive into yours
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after the the the fourth time that you transitioned in 2006 some of the landmines that you
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hit uh but i think mine was my pride and just learning how to be vulnerable with what's actually the reality in your life
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um you know people actually don't take that as weakness in the civilian world um they want to help um and you know
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they don't know how to help unless you're vulnerable so i think just being vulnerable with like
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what you're dealing with if you're lost tell tell that person that's in front of you you feel lost you know
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um if you just don't know what direction you need to be taken around the industry that you you
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think you want you know tell them that right um you know we don't always have to have it all figured out and i think i
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thought i needed to when i first got out of the uniform you know
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yeah yeah and yeah and part of my problem was i thought i did have it figured out and uh
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i did not have it figured out uh and you know that's kind of humbling in and of itself uh but by the fourth
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time i realized that and uh um at least to an extent uh you know i've
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there's there's one guy who uh when i was at centcom headquarters he always
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gave me good advice which i never listened to and then i thought i should listen to him yeah
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yeah yeah i i feel that role for a few people because i've had people come back and say you know i wish
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i would have listened to you and uh you know i i'm the same way i you know there's people who i you know i
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should have known that it was good advice i shouldn't follow through on it but
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for whatever reason i didn't yeah so this just didn't have the listening to hear right
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but let's dive into that a little bit more steve in 2006 fourth time you transitioned
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out of the united states army correct correct right let's let's walk through what were
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some of the key milestones um you know learnt lessons maybe even some landmines that you learned to
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overcome after that fourth transition um and also like you know
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break down like kind of like your background like how you became more in that time to kind of position
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yourself as an asset into the civilian world if that makes sense
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sure um one of the big things that i learned early on in my interviews after i got out the first time
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was that understanding money as a tool is is really important and i i think money is one of the greatest
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inventions ever and you know you don't have to walk around with a
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sheep slung over your shoulder lugging it around and trading it for chickens or whatever you can use money
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to purchase things but more importantly you can use money to evaluate uh evaluate things
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and their relative priority in to one another and it's a kind of abstract way of doing
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it it isn't measured in necessarily in terms of uh pieces of gold or
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uh or sheep or chickens um you can use it across the board we use that a lot in risk management
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in uh in project program management where you value the risks you um you multiply the dollar value
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multiply that by the probability you have a risk score then based on that dollar
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value and you can evaluate risks in terms of each other
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i know when when i was in the army at least risk was more about life and limb we didn't think of
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it in terms of dollars but in the civilian world risk is more or less determined by the dollar
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value of the risk it can translate into it can't translate into life in the land it can translate
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into technological feasibility sometimes translate into schedule but ultimately
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it can be measured in terms of dollars and that's an important tool that you can use
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uh you can use money understand and then understanding how it works to determine whether or not
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you're making the right choices what is the net present value of something versus the net present value
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of something else so that's one of the key lessons that i learned when i first got
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out and there was a whole new field that i needed to understand
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and that's how to to work cost and money and so on so that's something worthwhile study while you're in if you study
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finance study accounting something like that even if that's not the field you want to
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get in it will help you understand how things how things work
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and then the main thing i thought that helped me was project management because i think that anybody who's been
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in the military has done projects especially if you've been
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a leader of any sort if you've accepted a mission to do something you've done a project
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and there's a the project management institute which is one of the world organizations
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that writes the the standards for um for project management and includes the
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ansi standards and the um iso standards they define a project as a temporary endeavor undertaken to
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create a unique product service or result and that's that's the definition of
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project management that's the definition of a project and project management is actually
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applying skills and knowledge to achieve the project but um a project itself is that's what the
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definition is in under pmi's definition and then uh i think i think that
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everybody who's been in the military has accomplished projects and you've had some past guests on who
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talked probably talked about this as well i know um uh some of the folks who've been on
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the path doc and so on they've talked about about this and uh but i think the terminology is important
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because one of the things that uh pmi does is you can get a project
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management professional certificate and a lot of uh places are looking for
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pmps project management professionals one of the things you'll find in the defense industry
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is they will ask for a program manager versus a project manager ah but they're kind of the same thing
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well they're programming the project according to pmi are two different things
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got it so a program according to pmi is a group of related projects sub programs and program activities that
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are managed in a coordinated way to obtain benefits not available for managing them
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individually okay so a program um is more in our in our terms uh company
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commander could be more of a program manager whereas a platoon leader or squad leader
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might be more of a project manager it's like macro versus micro pretty much yeah
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yeah and the thing is those are the pmi definitions now the dod def definition
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is different for them uh program is a directed funded effort that provides a new improved or continuing
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material weapon or information system or service capability in response to an approved need
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okay and then under project it says synonymous with program and general usage
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so in the dod area if you're if you want to stay in that industry
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you're going to see on the military side dod side you're going to see program managers
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so on the industry side you're also going to see program managers
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though their actual function by the pmi definition is a project manager
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okay so that that can be a little bit confusing to people looking at it initially why do they want a project
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management professional certification for a program manager well it's namely because it's dod
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oriented and they want program managers to talk to program managers
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and that's just kind of a hierarchy thing uh that's that's um
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been kept on uh three years in uh in dod industry so uh and you know i'm big on
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on using the right terminology i think uh at least when i was a lieutenant we were all taught
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um say what you mean and think about saying the right thing like when you say if you
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were to tell your squad leader take care of the prisoners okay does that mean keep them safe feed
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them uh and make sure they're sheltered or does that mean
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you know take care of the prisoners you want to be clear on what you mean you want to make sure that you know it
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does indeed mean that you want them to be taken care of safe
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getting taken back to uh the rear and so on which is a great which is a great
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example steve right um that's a prime example of a program manager versus a project manager my eyes you correct me
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if i'm wrong but you know the program manager is hey go take care of those prisoners
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right the project manager is okay what is the components of what that actually looks like that's what i'm hearing okay
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it could be part of it yeah yeah and yeah and the in one of the things the
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big difference between program and project is many times at the program level you may
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have to make sub-optimal decisions for a particular project
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that will help out the entire program so let's say you have a dozen different projects
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but you need a key resource assigned to for the projects and he can't do them all at once
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so you'll have to prioritize the projects and assign the resource
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to the projects that are more key to the program so that may actually delay some of the
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projects and the project manager can do everything in his power to keep the
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the project on a budget but because the program decision he may be
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late because the program decided that for the overall program it's better to have a resource work on a different
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project and that comes across in real life all the time there are
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d-pass rated programs the defense priority and allocation system uh people may have heard about it
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recently when they wanted the president to force industry to uh do something with the covet 19
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masks or something like that well there is a there's a system uh there's two ratings there's do
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and dx programs the dx programs are the highest priority and those programs
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you have to work on first more or less those are programs in industry if you get a dx
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program you have to put every other program aside and work on that one
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first so in that case at a program level for the program that the government has
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uh it is saying that all the other projects that are underneath this program
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are of lesser value than this part of it so the there's only 13 government programs that are dx rated last time i
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went and looked most well some of them are classified so i don't even know what they are but
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um there's some are the like the the joint strike fighter and the the b2 bomber but
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then there's others classified that i would just add to this um steve is like
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um with that being said it sounds like a priority uh prioritizing system which i think is
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key now that if there's an ambitious vet listening to this right now
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is why is that important to him is that something they'll learn in their project management
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certification program their program management certification why is that important to
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them prioritization is important um now the d-pass that only applies if you're
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working in the dod industry and you'll you'll learn about that if you are in the dod industry and in that case
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it becomes very important and not everybody understands it
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so you'll have a leg up if you do in general understanding uh the prioritization is
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important because as a project manager your your basic job is to be on time on scope and on budget those
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are the three things you're generally measured by it's kind of like they're so well yeah
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yeah so while you're striving to do that if you're working under a program program may
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undercut you in one or more of those areas so you have to to understand that that may be coming
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you may not have the priority program priority project and that's one of the things uh
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that has happened to me in the past where i haven't had the the dx rated project
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somebody else has had it so they get first dibs on bringing in the specific
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engineer or the manufacturing capability or something like that
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so and it can be a different system the the company's strategy may change
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that's where uh there's another concept called project portfolio management which is at a at a higher level where
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it's linking projects to strategy the company or organization
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strategy so what it does there is that's where the prioritization really comes in is it looks at all of the the projects
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and it can be with modern software it can be done in real time it can be as the projects are
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being worked and you're making your reports in it can look at which ones are on budget
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on schedule on scope and also how they relate to the company's strategy company's
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strategy may change over time so your particular project may change over time
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you have to understand it's not a not a personal thing if your project gets cancelled
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even if you're on on scope on budget and on time your project could very well be
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canceled just because the changing priorities within the organization so
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that's that's a an important lesson to learn not to take things like that personally it's it's uh part
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of the way things work especially in uh more modern
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more astute organizations where they where they're being more agile more flexible
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and they have to adapt their strategy to the current situation and uh you know the if you're doing the best
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you can you'll still you can still count that as a success even though it was cancelled
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so that's one things i advise people to keep in mind and i think one of the things also that
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i've been trying to keep in mind myself right now is to talk about organizations
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as opposed to companies because there's uh there are many organizations that use
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program project management project portfolio management they can be for-profit
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they can be non-profit it can be government one of my favorite things to tell peop
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ask people is what is the difference between a for-profit organization
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and a non-profit organization the answer is the money left over at the end isn't called profit
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so even if you have a non-profit organization you're working at a charity or or some other type of
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organization all the other principles of business apply to your organization
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you have there there's different legalities and so on that also apply but you still have to have
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more money coming in and going out or your bit your organization is going to fail
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so um you know this applies across the board it applies to cities it applies to
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states applies to charities it applies to for-profit organizations and to an
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extent it can even apply to your personal life if you want to apply it that way so
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again that's another important reason to learn about money one of the key things about money is that
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it doesn't care about what kind of organization you are the same the same things apply to it uh
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and you need to have like i said more coming in going out yeah well that's great i love you
00:28:02
breaking down the terminology and the different kind of industries and what kind of like human capital
00:28:08
certification that you need to be gathering right ambitious vet if you're listening to this
00:28:13
that you need to build your economical values so that's that's perfect now i would i would say
00:28:19
that yeah money i think flows no matter what but the only thing i would kind of throw back
00:28:23
at you steve is like one thing that we're looking at we were talking about rebranding before
00:28:28
we went live here is even with us as we're looking to either pivot into nonprofit
00:28:33
or elevate our for-profit legal entity you know also with those different entities legal
00:28:38
entities it's also where the money is coming from a non-profit nonprofit can't raise venture capital
00:28:44
crowdfunding or angel investors maybe family and friends money but not
00:28:50
vc money right um it's different how you actually source the money but to your point you know i just think it's
00:28:58
important to know the terminology when you're out there trying to find a lucrative career
00:29:03
or if you're a contractor consultant looking to become a project manager program manager and stuff like that how
00:29:08
do you actually communicate in the terminology that's going to land you that
00:29:12
lucrative fulfilling career right right you're absolutely right and uh for program and project managers
00:29:20
uh the project manage project management institute really helps you out they have a lexicon a book that you can
00:29:28
look through and it helps show you whatever how everything is defined
00:29:33
as uh the project management body of knowledge uh which you would study from uh in
00:29:38
general to get your pmp they actually have a program management professional
00:29:44
and some other other certifications for people who aren't quite ready to get uh pmp or pgmp
00:29:53
so they have plenty of um plenty of certifications for you that you can get while you're in the military
00:30:02
in the in the post 911 gi bill does does uh pay for that
00:30:08
nice for those certifications that's huge that's awesome and i love how project management's
00:30:14
starting to become like the easy transition for service members i think it's just
00:30:18
amazing uh where we can actually turn our passion into profits as i think doc you know said inside of
00:30:25
our interview to your point but you know um i want to kind of pivot into kind of like the one the other thing
00:30:32
that we're talking about our priests pre-screening conversation a few weeks back steve and that was
00:30:39
the other challenge that veterans deal with to your point is terminology transit translating their military
00:30:45
experience into organizations corporations companies and stuff like that
00:30:50
so that they can actually find the lucrative careers the fulfilling careers the impactful work that they want to be
00:30:56
getting not just a job something that's just paying the bills right which i think
00:31:01
a lot of us fall victim on so i would throw this back on you how can we go about translating
00:31:08
our military experience okay the i think one of the key things in particular in
00:31:15
program project management is taking a look at uh the the pembach looking at the lux con
00:31:25
and just jotting down what you do in the military and how that aligns and that's one of the
00:31:32
the nicest things about uh pmi is they're very focused on those sorts of things
00:31:39
and they they make things align um or allow you to align and many chapters by the way have military liaisons so
00:31:47
many of the pmi chapters uh are they have somebody who's there to be a lazy liaison whatever military
00:31:56
units are in the area so you can hook up with them and they'll help you out and i sound like it
00:32:01
probably sound like a cheerleader for pmi but um i'm i'm just a member i'm not not on the board or anything anywhere
00:32:08
but i think it is a really good organization and like i said definitions are are key
00:32:13
and that helps make that transition a lot easier and uh we talked about in the past one
00:32:20
of the things i did at centcom we uh at sitcom headquarters uh operational planning teams are really
00:32:28
the same as integrated product teams and it's basically
00:32:33
developing a an operational plan is like a project so there are too many operational
00:32:40
planning teams popping up everywhere everything was being called an opt and the chief of staff didn't like that
00:32:47
he was unhappy that all these things were popping up they probably should have
00:32:51
been called something else so he wanted an sop written for establishing
00:32:57
uh an opt operational planning team so basically what i did is i played drives from the pembach the project managing
00:33:06
management body of knowledge and i just i just i took that translated it into military
00:33:13
ease uh it still wasn't quite there so i had to make even more military
00:33:18
but uh basically i just did the same thing as develop how you develop a integrated product
00:33:24
team or project team and they were happy with that they cut down on number opts and
00:33:31
worked out pretty well i thought about one story by the way just to illustrate it kind of a failure in terminology
00:33:43
again it was that when i was at centcom headquarters and uh i was watching the news and there
00:33:49
was a briefing from i think it was mnfi multinational forces iraq
00:33:55
um press officer and he was talking this was 2006 and he was talking about we're going to have the largest air
00:34:05
assault since the beginning of the war okay and i sat there and he kept going on the briefing and i said
00:34:13
i said i'm pretty sure i said out loud i said tell them what air assault means and he kept on going he said tell him
00:34:19
what arrows tell him what aerosol means and he never did and of course that has a very specific meaning
00:34:27
later on in the day i was watching the news and or maybe it was the next day and uh the reporter was saying well
00:34:35
that the the big that great big air assault that we were promised seems to have fizzled
00:34:42
we've only seen a couple jets and only a few bombs were dropped though there were a lot of helicopters
00:34:47
in the air today and well that's you know the definition of an air assault is
00:34:54
an assault by a helicopter but you know this is hanging out they're just hanging out
00:34:59
and i just knew that was going to backfire and they you know they painted it as a big
00:35:05
failure when it turned out to have been a success because they the
00:35:10
the spokesman didn't define for them what air assault meant
00:35:17
so when when you have jargon and you know it's second nature to you so you got to think about this a little bit
00:35:23
when you have jargon that's a military jargon military words simple as they are aerosol it means
00:35:31
you know one thing to you think about it from the the receiver's viewpoint what do
00:35:37
they know about the military think about how they're going to perceive it
00:35:42
so they don't know uh the difference between a platoon leader or platoon commander in the marine corps
00:35:50
and a squad leader they don't know what a company commander does they don't know what a battalion
00:35:56
commander does uh so you have to translate things into terms that folks can understand
00:36:06
that's good that's good because i was gonna add like an air assault in the civilian world maybe
00:36:11
a drone coming to drop a water balloon on your head or something right so they think of drones they you know i
00:36:18
don't know but they think of something different right yeah the reporter was thinking
00:36:23
hey there all these jet aircraft are coming in bombing things and and he only saw a couple so he
00:36:29
thought it was a it fizzled but he did notice a lot of helicopters but you know
00:36:35
and that's that's all based on the the sender is the one who's responsible for the message
00:36:42
you have to take into account the receiver now you know i i struggle with this all the time i yeah
00:36:48
i i think about it am i saying what i really mean to say
00:36:52
so um it's it's a work in progress and i think for uh people like me who aren't
00:37:00
gifted with a gift of gab um it can be a little bit difficult other people it's an easier transition
00:37:08
but i think that most for most people you've got to really look at what is it that you're really trying to say
00:37:15
and make sure you actually say that from the listeners perspective yeah no that's brilliant and um i also
00:37:23
love the jargon part i mean just for my own life over here an ambitious fact look at an
00:37:28
area of life right now that you may feel convoluted because everyone's throwing jargon words
00:37:34
right i think that's one of the key sources to a lot of the confusion that happens in the military
00:37:38
transition is one key example in my life right now is we're looking to raise precedent
00:37:43
money for the next stages of the ambitious vet network and right now
00:37:47
steve man i'm in all kinds of vc books i'm inside of a course just learning to your point the terminology to even
00:37:55
navigate inside that industry right because sure you know a mid-level manager inside of a sales organization
00:38:02
is called different as a mid-level manager inside of a vc firm that has
00:38:06
a cap of 300 million dollars to throw at you if you know how to speak their language
00:38:11
um and that's just that's just key and i think a lot of ambitious vets maybe you that are listening to
00:38:16
this you may get impatient with the process and to steve's point you've got to slow down sometimes to
00:38:24
accelerate later um and learn the terminology learn the jargon words and
00:38:29
find out ways to simplify that because you know there's a lot of wisdom in simplifying
00:38:34
jargon don't you sure i i agree and uh the uh the easier it is for somebody
00:38:42
else to understand uh the easier it'll be for you to communicate what you want to communicate
00:38:48
and a lot of times it takes work uh i forget who said it but he he'd written a somebody wrote a letter
00:38:55
many years ago when they write letters and he said um basically my letter would have been
00:39:02
shorter if i'd had more time so you know it it takes some work in order to whittle things down to their
00:39:09
essence that's why a good mission statement good vision statement for an
00:39:14
organization is concise and conveys exactly the exact intent that is meant to
00:39:22
and it that's why it takes a long time to develop a correct mission statement and
00:39:29
in the military too at centcom headquarters we wrestled with those
00:39:36
and us and it's in mission statements uh for days on end what should it say to convey the right meaning
00:39:44
so that it gets down to the lowest level they they understand what exactly the mission
00:39:50
statement is and uh it's it may seem easy well yeah of course you know it's
00:39:58
it's long how could i not understand that well it took a lot of work a lot of work to get to those
00:40:04
five words because you start off with a hundred and you have to whittle it down to the
00:40:08
essence of what uh what you really want to say and convey yeah
00:40:14
well that's a whole nother skill but we'll get into that maybe in a later episode steve we're going to take a
00:40:19
quick 10 second break just to thank our sponsor
00:40:23
we'll be right back with steve nashki if you're looking to gain relevance in your next venture
00:40:30
in the new landscape of the pandemic threat overwhelming uncertainty and social distancing
00:40:35
amber chevette i encourage you to own your life own your story and own every room you step inside of through
00:40:41
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00:40:53
leadership to the next level make sure to enter in code ambitious and that's spelled a m
00:40:58
b i t i o u s to take advantage of your 10 military discount again that's rooftop
00:41:06
leadership dot com all right ambitious vet welcome back right inside the trenches we got
00:41:13
steve nashki um from pm putin publicly thank you so much pundit
00:41:21
and uh he's been diving into some golden grenades um throughout the whole show around just
00:41:28
how do you actually start leveraging terminology how do you simplify terminology how do you get into
00:41:34
the project management industry or program management industry
00:41:38
and start simplifying the terminology so you can actually get out there and create the the lucrative
00:41:46
purpose centered and just fulfilling career that you're committed to portraying so steve man we got a
00:41:52
transition here um a tradition here actually is three golden grenades you can
00:41:58
pretty much summarize the show into three core golden grenades wisdom bombs or you
00:42:04
can bring in three brand new ones um what would be three girl grenades you could drop into
00:42:10
an ambitious vet that's looking to stay unstuck in their life today i think the first one would be to
00:42:17
understand money as a tool and how it is used in whatever industry they are in in
00:42:24
order to measure things and to understand how it drives the organization and
00:42:34
and why it why why decisions are made many times i when i speak to people one of the questions i will ask is
00:42:44
why are you here or why do you work where you work and most of the times people will say
00:42:50
well i'm here to get an education or i work where i work to make money to to do this and i enjoy this kind of work
00:42:58
blah blah blah so and they make the assumption that i assume that they're going to make that
00:43:04
i'm asking from their perspective so what i challenge them to do is again
00:43:12
look at it from the organization's perspective you're working where you're working because the
00:43:18
organization needs somebody with your skills your abilities your temperament
00:43:23
to fulfill a role you're at school because studying something because industry
00:43:30
needs people with those skills and those abilities so
00:43:34
again it's kind of like with the communicating uh to a listener understand from the
00:43:41
listeners perspective and you'll be able to communicate what you want
00:43:46
understand from the organization's perspective and this applies you know within the military as well
00:43:54
you'll understand decisions better if you look at it from the perspective of higher rather than
00:44:02
just uh from your perspective why are you in the military because i'm patriotic
00:44:06
because i want to do this well you're there also because the military needs somebody with your
00:44:13
skills abilities temperament and so on so the military may make decisions that you don't think are right
00:44:21
same with your organization but it's based on their perspective their right so if if you look at it
00:44:29
uh from that perspective you'll have a better idea of what decisions are going are being made
00:44:35
why they're being made and where they're going to lead down the road
00:44:40
and that's the same with understanding money because the money drives a lot of organizations and understanding how the
00:44:47
money is flowing and how it ties into strategy will help you understand the
00:44:52
organization's current decisions and where they might be driving down the road so it might give you a heads up
00:44:58
hey this organization is going in a different direction than i want to go and i need to find another organization
00:45:04
or i need to change my path in order to stay relevant in this organization
00:45:09
or this is how i can continue in this position and help achieve those goals and to an extent if you're a program
00:45:19
manager or project manager understand how your particular project ties into the
00:45:27
program or ties into the the company or organization's
00:45:31
strategy again that will help you understand the decisions at the higher level
00:45:38
of okay while you're canceling my project everything's been going well well maybe it doesn't align with
00:45:44
strategy anymore so if you understand all the way through like in the military you understand
00:45:50
uh two up and one down what the mission is same thing here understand the strategy
00:45:56
two up and one down in order to see which way the company is going
00:46:02
so it's worthwhile understanding what the company's strategy is actually pay attention to what the
00:46:07
mission the vision and strategy are and keep those in mind when you're making your own decisions
00:46:14
to to help bolster the strategy and become more valuable to the organization
00:46:22
and lastly something that we didn't really talk about i don't think we talked about it all but
00:46:28
uh is learn the software that is relevant to your your position your
00:46:37
company um in if you're a project manager or program manager learn scheduling software microsoft
00:46:46
project is probably the the most prevalent one but there's primavera p6 and there's
00:46:51
other other scheduling softwares but you should understand the software
00:46:55
understand if you're if you're an oracle company understand using oracle if you're if uh all you use
00:47:03
is microsoft office or google the google uh suite you know unders if that's what your company uses
00:47:10
understand it become an expert in it be a go-to person for that for that software
00:47:16
that makes you more valuable and again it ties back into the company's strategy they picked
00:47:22
that software for a reason usually a lot of times it may have to do just with money but a lot of times
00:47:28
it can deal with giving themselves a competitive advantage and if that's the case then
00:47:35
your being an expert makes you more valuable to the company and and that's something you
00:47:40
won't learn necessarily in your first year or two this is something that you'll start really learning as you
00:47:46
as you move along and if you're uh if you become a known expert
00:47:52
within the company and understanding how the company runs you're more valuable than if you don't
00:47:58
know it become an essential employee there you go well steve brilliant
00:48:07
brilliant brilliant i told you beforehand i may i may screw up the name of your company
00:48:11
but it's pm pundit correct correct and where can we find out more about what you're doing because
00:48:17
it's amazing stuff man right now uh you can go to p.m pundit.com
00:48:24
p-m-p-u-n-d-i-t dot com uh we're gonna be uh doing some rebranding here in the near future but
00:48:31
that that will remain and um it'll be more of an educational area than it is now
00:48:39
and uh if you want to reach out to me uh directly it's s natchke p.m pundit.com so
00:48:48
first initial last name pm pundit.com and uh i think if i understand the your target audience
00:48:56
uh correctly most of them probably won't miss need my services but that's okay i'm not
00:49:04
here to really sell my services i'm hoping that i've provided uh some some useful information to fellow
00:49:13
veterans and uh that's been my goal today and uh if you want to learn more feel free to
00:49:19
contact me uh i won't charge fellow veterans just to help them out in their career
00:49:25
so let me know if if you have any questions and uh i guess lastly uh i've been
00:49:32
seeing a lot of this on linkedin lately uh i think we've been losing uh too many too many of our
00:49:38
fellow veterans either to their own hand or as a consequence of uh substance abuse
00:49:44
so um i encourage again people go go go talk to your fellow veterans go to
00:49:51
the american legion go to vfw or other veterans organizations and
00:49:56
find folks who've been in a in a similar situation um they're there to help and uh it's
00:50:04
i know you somehow you look at those are for old folks but they're looking for young folks to come in because someday
00:50:10
you're gonna be the whole folks uh and uh they're willing to help you out
00:50:15
and there's many of them been in the same place you've been they'd be happy to
00:50:22
help you out it's awesome stuff steve with that we're gonna send you off man thanks for being
00:50:28
on the show you're welcome it's been a pleasure the ambitious vet is available on all
00:50:36
popular podcast platforms go to vet vettrainingcoaching.com to subscribe
00:50:42
rate and share with fellow vets again today's show is brought to you by brute force sandbags
00:50:49
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